Historic Racing Groups Competition cars covered by the CAMS 5th Category regulations are classified according to vehicle type, age and technological development into some 20 different groups to facilitate competition between similar vehicles. Some of these groups are further divided into sub-groups.
Regularity, Sprints and Hillclimbs Sports and Racing Cars Touring Cars and Sports Sedans Production Sports Group J - Vintage Cars This group is intended to depict early racing design and development to include the important field of significant excellence in design and workmanship defined as the “vintage period”. Vehicles eligible are racing and sports cars with a competition history established before 31st December 1930. One-off special type vehicles constructed at any time using major components manufactured prior to the end of 1930 are catered for in Group Jb. Group K - Post Vintage Thoroughbred Cars This group is intended to cater for the pre and early post World War 2 period, including classically engineered factory constructed cars, local specials constructed on a one-off basis using production car components from the pre-war period, and some factory constructed cars which were modified during the group period, and fitted with engines from pre-war production cars.  Vehicles eligible will be racing and sports cars with a competition history established between 1st January 1931 and 31st December 1949, using major components manufactured prior to 31st December 1940. One-off special type vehicles constructed at any time using major components manufactured prior to the end of 1940 are catered for in Group Kb This group caters for cars with a competition history established between 1st January 1941 and the 31st December 1960. It is divided into two sub-groups. Lb - Racing Cars and Sports Cars This group caters basically for cars built for competition, either factory built or “one-off” specials. Lc - Square Riggers This group caters for “square rigger” sports cars (primarily MG TC) where it was common practice to remove the windscreen, mudguards and headlights and run as a racing car, at the whim of the owner. One-off special type vehicles constructed at any time after 1 January 1940 but prior to the end of 1960 are also catered for in this group. Group L - Historic Racing and Sports Cars Group M - Historic Racing and Sports Cars  This group is intended to cater for racing, sports racing and clubman sports cars with a competition history established between 1st January 1961 and 31st December 1965 Group O - Historic Racing and Sports Cars  This group is intended to cater for racing and sports racing cars with a competition history established between 1st January 1966 and 31st December 1969, but specifically excluding cars fitted with the early forms of aerodynamic devices which appeared towards the end of this period. Group P - Historic Racing and Sports Cars  This group caters for racing and sports racing cars with a competition history established between 1 Jan 1968 and 31 December 1972, which competed with the combination of early aerodynamic devices and treaded racing tyres. Group Q - Historic Racing and Sports Cars  This group caters for racing and sports racing cars with a competition history established between 1st January 1970 and 31st December 1977, and for cars excluded from classification in earlier historic groups because of the nature of the aerodynamic devices with which they are fitted. Group R- Historic Racing and Sports Cars  This group caters for racing, sports racing, and clubman sports cars complying with period rules for specific racing formulae, with a competition history established between 1st January 1978 and the various end dates as detailed in the CAMS Manual. Group F - Historic Formula Ford Racing Cars  This group is intended to cater for Formula Ford racing cars powered by the 1600 “Kent” engine, within the various sub groups set put below. Fa - Vehicles with a competition history established prior to 31 December 1977. Fb - Vehicles with a competition history established between 1 January 1978 and 31 December 1983 but excluding the Swift DB1. Fc - Vehicles with a competition history established between 1 January 1984 and 31st December 1989. Group V - Historic Formula Vee Racing Cars  This group is intended to cater for Formula Vee 1200 racing cars within the two sub groups set out below. Va - This group is intended to cater for Formula Vee racing cars with a competition history established in the period between 1 January 1965 and 31 December 1974. Vb - This group is intended to cater for Formula Vee racing cars with a competition history established between 1 January 1975 and 31 December 1985. Formula 5000 - Historic Racing Car This group caters for Formula 5000 racing cars, being factory cars which must have been constructed before 31st October 1977 or, if an Australian built car constructed specifically for F5000 and raced in F5000 events, must have been raced before 31st December, 1977. Touring Cars and Sports Sedans  -  Groups N, C, A and U Group N - Historic Touring Cars  Group Nb Group Nb is for series production type touring cars manufactured prior to 31st December 1964 of which 100 of the particular model must have been produced (also known as Appendix J). This group is open to cars which were built and established a competition history either in Australia or overseas, provided the make and model was homologated with the FIA. Group Nc Group Nc is for touring cars of a make and model which competed in Australia between 1st January 1965 and 31st December 1972 in either the Australian Touring Car Championship or in races specifically for the 3rd Category Group C Improved Touring Cars. Group Na Production touring cars as recognised by CAMS and commercially available in Australia prior to 31st December 1957, with the inclusion of certain run-on models Group A - Historic Touring Cars  Group A caters for vehicles with a competition history established in Australia and elsewhere in the period 1 January 1984 to 31 December 1992 in events run to regulations promulgated by FISA and or as adopted by CAMS for Group A Touring Cars Group C - Historic Touring Cars  Group C caters for vehicles with a competition history established in the period 1 January 1973 to 31 December 1984, in events run to regulations promulgated by CAMS for Group C Touring Cars in the period. Group U - Historic Sports Sedans  Group U caters for vehicles with a competition history established in the period pre-1986 in events run to regulations promulgated by CAMS for Sports Sedans – Group B (including Sports Racing Car Closed and GT Performance Cars – Group D). Production Sports Cars  -  Groups S and T Group S - Production Based Sports Cars  Group Sb Group Sb is for production sports cars generally manufactured between 1st January 1961 and 31st December 1969 with the inclusion of model run-ons. Group Sc Group Sc is for non-turbo charged production sports cars generally manufactured and available in Australia between 1st January 1970 and 31st December 1977 with the inclusion of model run-ons. Group Sa Group Sa is for production sports cars, as recognised by CAMS, manufactured between 1st January 1941 and 31st December 1960 with the inclusion of certain run-on models (e.g. Mk1 Austin Healey Sprite). This group caters for production sports cars with a competition history established after 1 January 1941 and before 31 December 1981 and for factory competition variants either built, or with a competition history established between 1st January 1941 and 31st December 1977. Group T - Production Based Sports Cars Regularity Trials, Sprints and Hillclimbs Regularity Trials is where the driver nominates a lap time and endeavours to maintain that time over a number of flying laps of a racing circuit. Each tenth of a second away from the nominated time scores penalty points. The driver with the least number of points wins, the driver with the most points and furthest from their nominated lap time comes last. The level of safety in Regularity Trials is good, as outright speed or lap time is not a consideration in scoring. A car passing you on the track is not perceived as beating you. This has the effect of competitors not trying to block or ‘dice’ with each other, as in racing or sprinting, and generally much safer competition results. In fact, blocking and dicing is not tolerated and will attract a penalty from the officials of the event. Competing vehicles can range from standard road cars to highly modified race cars, for safety participants are sent out onto the track with other compatible vehicles that lap at similar speeds.     >  Drivers must be at least 14 years of age to participate in sprints and hold a CAMS level 2 Speed licence.     >  Vehicles must comply with Schedules A and B of the current CAMS Manual of Motor Sport.  Regularity Trials Sprints are mostly conducted at the recognised motor racing circuits around the country. Individual or small numbers of cars are released at regular intervals onto the track and generally complete several laps at a time racing against the clock, and not the other drivers out there at the time. Whilst sprints are not actually races, they give participants a great feel for what it is like to drive at high speed competitively around a race track and provide a fabulous test for car and driver alike. Competing vehicles can range from standard road cars to highly modified race cars, for safety participants are sent out onto the track with other compatible vehicles that lap at similar speeds.     >  Drivers must be at least 14 years of age to participate in sprints and hold a CAMS level 2 Speed licence.     >  Vehicles must comply with Schedules A and B of the current CAMS Manual of Motor Sport.   Sprints Hillclimbs are one of the oldest forms of competitive motor sport and enjoy a strong following throughout Australia. The essence of hill climbing is that it is a single car on the track at a time running against the clock. The tracks used are sometimes dedicated hill climb venues, or often short sections of closed public roads that have been upgraded for the purpose. Hill climbs cater for nearly every category of CAMS recognised vehicle and vary from standard road cars through to dedicated and specialist hill climb cars exhibiting the pinnacle of motor sport technology from around the world. Part of the skill involved in hill climbing is learning to drive the car quickly without the opportunity to warm tyres and brakes. It therefore proves to be an invaluable training ground for drivers in all aspects of car control. Competing vehicles can range from standard road cars to highly modified race cars.     >  Drivers must be at least 14 years of age to participate in sprints and hold a CAMS level 2 Speed licence.     >  Vehicles must comply with Schedules A and B of the current CAMS Manual of Motor Sport.   Hillclimbs Sports and Racing Cars  -  Groups J, K, L, M, O, P, Q, R, F, V and F5000
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